Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Getting Inside The Writer's Mind

Growing up, I was always in my own little world. I would sit outside, stare into my back bushes and think I had invisible people who lived in there. On certain days, there was something “extra” in the air. A bit of magic? Or days when I felt the winds of change… knowing something exciting was on the horizon.

Now, there are going to be two reactions to this last paragraph. One, let’s get this girl into a mental hospital, stat! Or two, yeah, I know what you mean.

I’d like to think the latter are writers… not sure.  I’ve always felt I’ve had an extra sense. (No, I do not see dead people. Yeah, cliché, but you were all thinking it!) A writer’s sense. Where you’re able to take in extra feeling or magic in certain situations and absorb it. Feel it when others can’t.

Am I making sense?

I think it takes a different kind of person to be able to take one of these situations and use words to create the mood and make it come to life. You have to be able to see it/sense it first in order reproduce it.

I bring this up because not everyone “gets” this. I think there are people who really do just live day to day without feeling that extra “something” that’s begging to be seen and written. They are just content to… be. (Which is fine! No slamming here!)

We writers aren’t.

We’re driven. In a different way than most.

So what I’m curious about is do you understand what I’m saying or should I go find my straightjacket? What were you like as a child? Were you always in your own little world, creating stories before you even knew what you were doing? Writing?

I’d love to know your thoughts.

Red. Head. Out. :D 

44 comments:

  1. When I was younger, I would dream up stories of princess and princess. Every one always had romance. Always.

    I do agree that I feel driven to write. I don't think I'm more driven than anyone else who finds their passion, but I am grateful, every day, that I've found mine.

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  2. I was much the same as you when I was a child! I was always imagining something, playing out stories in my head, and occasionally writing them down on paper. I had a much better imagination when I was younger though!

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  3. I think it's something all creative people possess. Seems odd that there are people who don't have it, but many just see things 'as is.'

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  4. My brother thinks I'm insane. He says that all my writing is just a waste of time, and that I should try to get a second job to afford more things (I already work 40-hours a week). He says he worries about me and wonders when I'll ever grow up and stop putting so much effort into things that will never pay off and that no one cares about. He says, "Mike, everyone in our family is mediocre. You're no different. Just accept that and get a second job to put money in retirement."

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  5. I never wrote very much, but I definitely had an active imagination. I used to imagine I had a menagerie of awesomely cool animals in my room. Baby tigers, and flying squirrels, and bunny rabbits... each had their own personal cage-house and I'd take them out and play with them individually. I also had imaginary friends, and played house, castle, cowboys & indians, teenage mutant ninja turtles (the boys always made me be April O'Neil and I hated it)...

    So if you're crazy, then I am too. Where's my strait jacket?

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  6. We always made up our own games growing up. And I know what you mean about the change in the air and feeling when something is going to be different. I think everyone has the capabilities for this but many people tune it out.

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  7. Yeah, I know what you mean :) (Also, that picture is a little creepy). I like living in my day dreams though. That magical element makes everything in this element better, if you know what I mean.

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  8. You do realize you are asking a whole bunch of crazy people this question, right? ;)

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  9. I totally get that, writers are always looking for a new perspective on the world so we see things differently. But any other artist might see it in a different way from us. We all have unique ways of looking at the world, which is what makes it beautiful!

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  10. That makes complete sense to me.

    When I was little my mother worried about me because I loved spending so much time alone. I would hide in the back of my grandfathers closet behind the fur coats, or walk in the gardens on the side of the house, or under the bathroom sink, and just be in my own world.

    I didn't write stories down (as I had trouble with reading and writing through the majority of grade school), but I would sit and just tell stories until my voice went out. My grandmother gave me a handheld tape recorder so I could save my stories for later, but really it was to save everyone else from having to listen to my endless talking about made up things.

    I totally think that writers are both driven to write and have an extra writing sense. I think we see the world differently, in a way that makes us able to extract something more from the ordinary in order to create.

    Writing is almost a compulsion in some ways.

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  11. I totally get it. I've lived in my own little worlds all my life. I should have started writing 30 years ago.

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  12. Hmm. . .Now I know another reason (besides the red hair!) that you like Anne of Green Gables:) I was pretty imaginative as a kid. I played with matchbox cars, but not at all like a boy. I "drove" them around and had imaginary people and an entire neighborhood of things going on. I could play that way for hours!

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  13. At first, I thought it was a product of growing up as an only child. I had an active imagination, imaginary friends and later, a writing vice. But as a young adult, I realized not everyone perceives the world in the same way. A very good friend of mine is an artist (the paint and paint brush kind). I know she "sees" the world differently than I do, or my husband who's an engineer. My husband doesn't understand how I "get" all my crazy ideas from or why I need to write them down. In short, I think writers and artists are just wired differently than the rest. It's not better or worse, just different. And I'm okay with different! Ok, now I'll go put on my straightjacket and meet you in the play room. (:

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  14. You're most definitely not crazy! I was daydreaming and playing make-believe pretty much from when I was born!

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  15. i find stories everywhere! i am just so happy to know so many others who get it with me & dont give me strange looks for writing!

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  16. Oh, as a kid I was always carrying around a notebook, a pencil, a box of kleenex and a small waste basket. (I had allergies. But that's another story.) Writing stories was (is) just part of who I am.

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  17. Morgan, I'll be right there in that hospital with you. Save me a jacket... :)

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  18. I think writers are certainly more perceptive and sensitive to all things visual and sensual. We craft the worlds of our novels with fine details so it's natural we'd pick up on the more subtle things in real life too.

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  19. when I was a child, i had worlds in my head and I was always a character in those stories. I lived them vividly in my mind. I didn't know it then but I was creating stories - my only regret is I didn't write them down. I'm sure I would have been on the best seller's list when I was 10!

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  20. Getting in a writers head is like attempting to crack a coconut with a toothbrush...'there ain't any happenings.'

    As writers, we generally dream outside the box we affectionately call our head. And rightly so.

    By the way, if you question your sanity, you're not mad...or so the saying goes.

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  21. If I did something bad when I was little my mother used to punish me by making me sit in the corner. She realized that wasn't effective when I started dragging my stuffed animals and little rocking chair to the corner to continue my adventure of being in the bow of a great ship riding the high seas. It's no surprise I eventually became a writer.
    Richard Alan

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  22. Girl - I can't go without your blog. For real. Even when I'm supposed to be taking the week off! lol.
    And man --- I don't think anyone wants to be in my head. hahaha.
    Hmmm - I remember things like your memories, but I also remember having a vivid imagination for getting scared. When I went to the bathroom. I'd get all ready to RUN out right as I flushed the toilet because I was afraid monsters would jump out of the shower and grab me.
    And - I never got out of bed like normal. I always had to jump in and jump out of bed. I seriously thought something would reach out from under my bed and grab my feet.

    *shakes head*
    I told you I was weird!

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  23. I might be about to start a chain of hate mail or something, but I'd press this further and say that not all people who write have this.

    AND I think the really good writers have loads of that extra sense, and the pretty good writers have some of it, and . . .

    I think you can write without it, but I think your writing is WAY better for having it.

    Great post.

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  24. See, I bet half of us were thinking... "hmmm, so she's going to end up in the straitjacket... how are we going to get her out of the evil clutches of the Klutcheners?"

    PS... May I be the first to say CONGRATS :)

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  25. You are the Grand Prize Winner of the Got Green? Blog O'hop contest:)

    Stop by to claim your prize when you can :)

    Congrats again :)

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  26. As a kid, I had a whole world I could visit inside my head. It could have been madness but I prefer to think of it is imagination.

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  27. Great post. I remember being a little kid looking up at the sky as airplanes flew by, and I wondered where the people were going. I made up stories about their destination and what they would do when they got there.

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  28. Super thoughts, Morgs! I was always a child in her own little world of make believe. Yet, I never thought I had the little bit of "magic" to write. It wasn't until later on that the wind of my dreams carried me an idea that stuck. That HAD to be written. Now, I've got at least three different book ideas festering in my mind, ready to escape into the reality of words.
    Anyway, you aren't crazy... only crazy like all writers are. haha Bring on the straigh jackets (if only we can still type). Bam!

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  29. I was talking to my bf about this last night. In my mind, it's a horrible thing to not be able to create different worlds, or separate yourself from this world. I can't imagine people who just live day to day without thinking about the things I think about or without creating something magical.

    ...Then my bf said "Well...that's what I do."

    And I thought that was sad. And I know people don't understand me many times. I think they feel like I live a sad life because I like to be in my worlds rather than in this world most of the time...But that's my passion and where I feel most at home!

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  30. I made up stories and lived in a fantasy world all my life. I used to go to the school bus and pretend there were others with me. I was in high school, mind you. :) I think the worlds in my head are so much more fascinating than reality, and I never want to leave. :)

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  31. If they size you up for a straight-jacket, save me one! :)

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  32. I always had stories in my head :) Though I never thought about getting them out until this past July. Now the flood gates have opened :)

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  33. I love the way you think! When I was a little girl my backyard was like a magical playground full of opportunities. And on rainy days the living room became a ship at sea in the middle of a storm. Imagination knows no boundaries and allows you to explore any realm you please.

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  34. Oh, and I also meant to tell you thanks for following my blog as well! I'm happy to have you join me on my journey. :)

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  35. Yeah, I know what you mean.
    When I was a child, I used to fantasize a lot. I could become very introspective myself. At times, when I wanted to feel protected, I'd pretend I was my hand and I'd tuck it into the pocket. I could see through the tiny pores of the fabric without being seen.
    Sensing requires sensitivity. Some people are more than others. Some people become that, some people don't.
    Which is just fine, I suppose :)
    Thanks for sharing. I love your posts!

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  36. For years, I would put myself to sleep by making up stories in my head while laying in bed. I also make up stories to entertain myself if I'm bored and have no book to read. I don't remember a time when I didn't do this.

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  37. I think I get what you're saying. The little spark that makes things, even ordinary and everyday things, feel significant.

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  38. I totally get it! I'm a middle child, so I was always with my older sister or my younger brother playing something. I'm starting to think maybe my imagination was a driving force for our play. And, when I think of what my super-power would be (yes, I am in need of a straight jacket), it's feeling things beyond what normal people can feel--sort of like Jasper in Twilight :)

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  39. Yeah, I know exactly what you mean. I spent most of my life daydreaming and inventing imaginative places and games, unfortunately I didn't get the stories down! Ha ha!

    Most of my primary school reports state in the comments, Carolyn needs to concentrate more! Hey I wasn't any dummy or anything, but I just liked to look out of the window!

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  40. Was I always in my own little world as a child? Oh, man. I could tell you stories. Then we would have to commit ourselves to the nearest institution. Stat (love that word)! :)

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  41. Oh, I totally get you, Morgan. It is true that as writers we do seem to sense things differently. I know that I have often been in my own little world. One year in high school I spent half a semester in my history class daydreaming a story rather than focusing on the lecture. I still managed to get an A so I guess it all worked out in the end.

    I've tagged you in my latest blog post. Feel free to stop by and check it out.
    http://bridgetsrantsnramblings.blogspot.com/

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  42. It was years before I discovered that everybody doesn't have their own world inside their head. I felt sort of sorry for those that didn't.

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  43. Hi Morgan, I just had to say how much I love this image, it is really great, by the way I have just awarded you a Versalitle Blog Award!

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  44. Oh dear, I'm still always in my own little world. It's kind of a fun place :) But I grew up in a household that didn't view it so favorably so I understand the other side as well. There are certainly times when I wish I was just able to "be" but then again, I do love my stories!

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